Comprehensive Plan 2010/pgs 11-21

TABLE 7

 

FAMILY AND HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1999


Subject


Households


Families


Nonfamily
households


Total


Married-
couple
families


Female
householder,
no husband
present

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

346

266

220

22

80

Less than $10,000

19

3

3

0

16

$10,000 to $14,999

14

7

0

5

7

$15,000 to $19,999

27

19

13

4

10

$20,000 to $24,999

21

14

14

0

8

$25,000 to $29,999

19

12

11

1

7

$30,000 to $34,999

19

24

15

2

0

$35,000 to $39,999

35

20

16

2

15

$40,000 to $44,999

27

21

14

1

4

$45,000 to $49,999

21

16

12

4

4

$50,000 to $59,999

27

27

25

0

2

$60,000 to $74,999

43

43

40

3

0

$75,000 to $99,999

42

34

33

0

4

$100,000 to $124,999

17

16

14

0

0

$125,000 to $149,999

6

4

4

0

0

$150,000 to $199,999

3

0

0

0

3

$200,000 or more

6

6

6

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Median income (dollars)

43,000

49,318

53,500

31,250

24,167

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mean income (dollars)

52,633

56,490

60,201

32,923

33,516

 

 

Source:  U.S. Census Bureau

 

 

The median and mean incomes for households in 1999 were $43,000 and $52,633 respectively.  The family and household income for 1999 is shown in table 7.  Approximately 4.6 percent of the population is below poverty level with 73.2 percent of Royalton’s population 16 years and over employed compared to 63.9 percent in the entire country’s population.

 

 

11

 

 

                                                                                               

Physical Development

 

A.                            Soil

 

The soil characteristics of the Township often influence the land use patterns and level of development.  Much of the Town’s soils consist of the Cushing-Alstad series.  The next most common series is the Greenwood-Loxley-Besemen.  Considerable Omega-Nemadji series soils are found in the northwest areas of the Township.  Peat is also commonly found, the majority being located along the waterways of the Town.

 

Of the soils found in Royalton Township, certain series have physical properties not conducive to structural development.  These soils may be subject to flooding, have low strength, poor percolation, frost action or other characteristics which make them hazardous to buildings or roads constructed upon them.  Soils in Royalton Township where development should be discouraged include peat, alluvial, and freer series.

 

B.                             Shorelands

 

Shorelands, as defined in Minnesota Statutes, is the area 1,000 feet from the ordinary high water mark of a lake and 300 feet from the ordinary high water mark of a river.  The Minnesota Shorelands Management Act determines minimum lot sizes, building setbacks, and establishes other provisions to protect the quality of waters and adjacent lands.  For this reason, the shorelands of the Township are identified as environmentally sensitive areas requiring special management.  Major Shoreland areas exist in the Township as a result of the presence of the Snake River. 

 

C.                              Shoreland Management Ordinance for Pine County Minnesota

 

Dated:  October 1, 1993 

Microfilm #336988, Pine County Recorder’s Office, and amendments thereto

 

 

Existing Land Use

 

The existing land use of Royalton Township is an important characteristic which will be considered in determining the type of future land uses and densities that are desired.  The Existing Land Use Map indicates generalized land uses and land cover of Royalton Township.  This map indicates the dominant land use/land cover per 40 acre parcel.  Cultivated and forested land constitutes the major land area with pasture/open land making up the rest of the Township’s land area.  Cultivated and pasture/open space uses are generally found in the central and east part of the Township.  A majority of the forested land is located on the west side of the Township.  The plat map indicates residences and land ownership patterns.  The most intensive development exists adjacent to Snake River and consists of year-round and seasonal residences.

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

 

Public Facilities/Service

 

There are no public water or sewer systems within the Township.  All existing water and sewer systems are on-site systems.  The Town Hall official address is:  6052 Royalton Road; Braham, MN 55006; and is located off State Highway 70.  Public facilities consist of a town hall building and maintenance facility.  The hall and maintenance buildings are used for meetings of the public, Town Board, and Planning Commission and these facilities are used as a voting poll for county, town, Federal, and State elections.

 

Fire service is provided through contracts with Pine City, Braham, and Rush City Volunteer Fire

Departments.  Law enforcement is provided through the Pine County Sheriff Department.  Planning and Zoning services are provided for the Township through the Board of Supervisors with the assistance of the Town Planning Commission and a Zoning Administrator.

  

 

Transportation

 

The transportation system of Royalton Township is shown on the Official Township Road Map.  This map indicates the jurisdiction of roads and road surface.

 

Of the approximately 71.4 miles of roads within Royalton Township, 6.4 miles are state trunk highway; 17 miles are county state aid roads; 21 miles are county roads; and 27 miles are township roads.  23 miles are paved or of a bituminous surface and 48.4 miles are gravel or soil surface.  The township owns and operates its own maintenance equipment - road grader and truck, and has part time employees for summer grading, snow removal, etc.

           

Most of the Township is well served by the present road system.  The present level of roads is appropriate due to the fact that the area is sparsely developed and is planned for limited development.

 

13

 

 

 

Fire Districts

 

Pine City Fire Department

Braham Fire Department

Rush City Fire Department

 

 

 

 

14

 

 

I.                   GOALS AND POLICIES

 

Natural Environment

 

A.    Goal:  To preserve and protect from development unique features and environmentally sensitive areas.

 

Policies

 

1.                  Development should be prohibited from areas with significant environmental or ecological vulnerability or for which development would be hazardous. 

 

2.         The quality and quantity of surface water and groundwater resources should be preserved by the appropriate regulation of all development activities which have the potential of impacting the water resources of the Township.

 

3.                  The importance of the forests, lakes, streams, and other natural features or     characteristics on the quality of life shall be recognized and appropriately managed to be preserved for future generations.

 

4.                  The Township’s unique, natural, scenic and historical areas should be identified, protected and developed for public use and enjoyment with the primary purpose of preservation of these resources.

 

Physical Development of the Community

 

Land Use

 

A.                Goal:  To identify areas suitable for development and establish land uses and development patterns appropriate for the level of services and facilities available.

 

Policies

 

1.                  No structural development such as construction of commercial, industrial, or residential structures should be permitted on soils with severe or very severe limitations unless acceptable engineering safeguards are employed.  These limitations include:

 

a.                   Slope in excess of 12 percent,

 

b.         Wetlands, peat and muck areas,

 

c.         Areas of exposed bedrock (soil depth less than six feet)

 

d.                  High water table,

 

 

16

 

 

 

 

e.                   Soils subject to severe wind and water erosion,

 

f.                   Soils of low permeability.

 

2.                  Development shall be limited in those portions of the Township which have significant areas of unsuitable soils or topography for buildings.

 

3.                  The open storage or accumulation of materials, equipment, or vehicles shall be limited to prevent nuisances or prevent a depreciative effect on adjacent properties, or threaten the health, safety and welfare of the public.

 

4.                  Development should be encouraged in those areas that have potential for providing an appropriate range of public services, including transportation, at the most economical cost to the County, Township and School District.  Developments which result in a negative fiscal impact to property values, the Township and all government entities due to increased service requirements, etc., shall be discouraged.

 

5.                  The majority of development occurring in the Township shall be guided to the areas adjacent to the major transportation facilities to the Town. 

 

6.                  Agricultural and residential land uses should be the primary land use within the Township and all other uses shall be considered as secondary or conditional.  Agricultural uses shall occur on lots of adequate size so as to not adversely impact adjacent lots.

 

7.                  Residential, commercial, and industrial development may be accommodated, consistent with the needs and desires of the Township and shall be located on existing, maintained roads and not adversely impact any existing land uses.

 

8.                  The Township will encourage quality housing for its residents by establishing standards for dwellings.

 

 

Public Services and Facilities

 

B.        Goal:  To provide for a cost-effective, suitable level of services consistent with the rural characteristics and land use goals and policies of the Township.

 

1.      The Township shall maintain a limited level of public services and facilities, consisting primarily of fire protection and road maintenance.  The Township’s public service and facility standards shall be maintained and improved only when necessary to accommodate existing and planned development.

2.      Development will be encouraged to maintain the rural character of the township. Development in remote areas or development patterns which

3.      require additional services and facilities, including new roads, will be discouraged.

The investment and mobility of the existing transportation system should be protected by instituting appropriate land use, density, building setback, and access controls so as to not exceed the capacity or reduced the function of the system.

 

17

 

 

 

 

IV.             DEVELOPMENT PLAN

 

Land Use Plan

 

The Land Use Plan outlines the future land use patterns and development densities desired by Royalton Township.  The plan is based on the issues and factors discussed in the Survey and Analysis Section and the Township’s desires and values stated in the Goals and Policy Section.

 

The Land Use Plan identifies the entire township as agricultural/residential except for the Shorelands Area.

           

A.        Agricultural/Residential Area

 

The Agricultural/Residential Area is characterized by mixed agricultural and residential uses as well as forests and lowland.  A portion of the area consists of soils not conducive to development. 

 

Commercial and industrial uses will be accommodated as secondary uses under special conditions. 

 

B.                 Shoreland Area

 

The Shoreland Area is that area in the Township within one thousand feet from the ordinary high water of lakes and three hundred feet from rivers.  This area is subject to special management under the Shoreland Management Ordinance for Pine County.  Any development activities and restrictions have to conform to Pine County and State Regulations. 

 

Public Service Facility Plan

 

The existing level of public services and facilities are planned to be maintained, but not expanded.  The existing transportation system generally will be maintained, but no new roads are planned.  Services such as public water and sewer systems are not planned for the foreseeable future.

 

In summary, the public service and facility plan indicates that the Township will continue to provide a minimum level of services to maintain the rural character of the township.  Development proposals will be limited to the capability of the existing level of public service.

 

 

 

 18

 

 

 

 

 

EFFECTUATION

 

 

SEC. 1     A statutory hearing to amend the Comprehensive Plan was held by Royalton Township Planning Commission on November 24, 2009.

 

 

SEC. 2     The Town of Royalton Planning Commission recommended to the Royalton Town Board of Supervisors by written recommendation dated December 15, 2009, that this Comprehensive Plan be adopted as the official municipal plan for the Town of Royalton.

 

 

SEC. 3      Nancy Dahlin-Teich moved the adoption of the Comprehensive Plan, and Duane Swanson duly seconded the motion and it was adopted on the following vote:

 

 

Yeas:  Leslie Orvis, Terry Lind, Duane Swanson, Nancy Dahlin-Teich, and Roberta Folkestad

 

Nays:  None

 

Absent:  None

 

Abstain:  None

 

 

SEC. 4     This Conditional Plan shall take effect and be in full force on the 15th day of December, 2009, upon its adoption by the Town Board of Supervisors for the Town of Royalton.

 

 

This Comprehensive Plan was declared adopted by the Town Board of Supervisors on the 15th

day of December, 2009.

 

 

 

20 

 

RESOLUTION NUMBER 001-2009

 

 

ROYALTON TOWNSHIP

COUNTY OF PINE

STATE OF MINNESOTA

 

 

A RESOLUTION ADOPTING THE ROYALTON TOWNSHIP COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

 

            WHEREAS,RoyaltonTownship wishes to adopt a Comprehensive Plan to promote orderly and economical development within the Township;

 

            AND WHEREAS, the Township Board deems it necessary to adopt a Comprehensive Plan to promote the health and welfare of the Township residents, and protect and preserve the environment and the quality of life in Royalton Township;

 

            NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED; that the Royalton Township Board hereby adopts the Royalton Township Comprehensive Plan.

 

 

Adopted this 26th day of January, 2010 by the Royalton Township Board

 

 

_________________________________                 

Leslie Orvis, Chairman

 

 

_________________________________

John Kemen, Supervisor

 

 

_________________________________

Terry Lind, Supervisor                                   

 

Attest:

 

 

_____________________________

Township Clerk:  Roberta Folkestad

 

Introduced:  November 24, 2009

Adopted:  January 26, 2010

Posted:  December 15, 2009

Drafted by:  Royalton Township Planning Commission

6052 Royalton Road

Braham, MN 55006

 

 

21